2014-04-07

What happens when ICANN is taken over by multi-stakeholders who do not believe in internet freedom?

What happens when ICANN is taken over by "multi-stakeholders" who do not believe in internet freedom? Nobody, least of all ICANN, is saying --

A Programmer's Perspective on the IANA Transition: "... Let's consider worst-case scenarios and develop mechanisms that would resolve those scenarios in a way that's at least as effective as the admittedly crude mechanism we have today — where the US government ensures a stable root if the IANA contractor can't, and where the threat of losing the IANA contract keeps ICANN accountable [at least in theory] to its global stakeholders and the public interest....

What happens if ICANN cancels the Affirmation of Commitments, which it can do with just 120 days notice? Or if ICANN fails to implement recommendations of an Affirmation review?

What happens if ICANN deliberately escapes legal presence in a nation where users, registrants, and contract parties need to seek legal remedies?

What happens if ICANN becomes financially insolvent?

What happens if ICANN approves a specific change to the root that could threaten its stability and security?

What happens if governments advise ICANN to remove TLDs from the root in order to suppress dissent and free expression? ...." (read more at the link above)




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